Behold

In his final sermon
Buddha didn’t speak.
He just held up
a tiny flower until
someone smiled.
Jesus didn’t preach
any religion at all.
He said, “Behold
the lilies of the field!”
That was enough
for anyone whose
eye was open.
Dante saw the whole
empyrean, hosts
and hosts of angels,
in the petals of a rose.
Wonder in silence
beyond thought,
your breath a stream
of unborn stars.
Friend, all that stands
between you and
this world of miracles
is your mind.

~ Fred LaMotte

Loving the unlovable

Jesus told us to love our enemy. “Father, Forgive them, for they know not what they do.” This teaching helps us know how to look at the person we consider to be the cause of our suffering.

If we practice looking deeply into his situation and the causes of how he came to be the way he is now, and if we visualize ourselves as being born in his condition, we may see that we could have become exactly like him.

When we do that, compassion arises in us naturally, and we see that the other person is to be helped and not punished. In that moment, our anger transforms itself into the energy of compassion.

Suddenly, the one we have been calling our enemy becomes our brother or sister. This is the true teaching of Jesus.

~ Thich Nhat Hanh, Living Buddha, Living Christ

Big Sur

“Paradise or no paradise, I have the very definite impression that the people of this [Big Sur] vicinity are striving to live up to the grandeur and nobility which is such an integral part of this setting. They behave as if it were a privilege to live here, as if it were by an act of grace they found themselves here. The place itself is so overwhelmingly bigger, greater, than anyone could hope to make it that it engenders a humility and reverence not frequently met with in Americans. There being nothing to improve on in the surroundings, the tendency is to set about improving oneself.”

~ Henry Miller

Urge, splurge, purge

A system that depends on growth can survive only if we progressively lose our ability to make reasoned decisions. After our needs, then strong desires, then faint desires have been met, we must keep buying goods and services we neither need nor want, induced by marketing to abandon our discriminating faculties and succumb instead to impulse.

You can now buy a selfie toaster, that burns an image of your own face onto your bread — the Turin Shroud of toast. You can buy beer for dogs and wine for cats; a toilet roll holder that sends a message to your phone when the paper is running out; a $30 branded brick; a hairbrush that informs you whether or not you are brushing your hair correctly. Panasonic intends to produce a mobile fridge that, in response to a voice command, will deliver beers to your chair.

Urge, splurge, purge: we are sucked into a cycle of compulsion followed by consumption, followed by the periodic detoxing of ourselves or our homes, like Romans making themselves sick after eating, so that we can cram more in. Continued economic growth depends on continued disposal: unless we rapidly junk the goods we buy, it fails. The growth economy and the throwaway society cannot be separated. Environmental destruction is not a by-product of this system. It is a necessary element.

The environmental crisis is an inevitable result not just of neoliberalism — the most extreme variety of capitalism — but of capitalism itself. Even the social democratic (Keynesian) kind depends on perpetual growth on a finite planet: a formula for eventual collapse. But the peculiar contribution of neoliberalism is to deny that action is necessary; to insist that the system, like Greenspan’s financial markets, is inherently self-regulating. The myth of the self-regulating market accelerates the destruction of the self-regulating Earth.

[…] There is no environmental rescue plan: to admit the need for one would be to admit that the economic system is based on a series of delusions. The environmental crisis demands a new ethics, politics and economics.”

– George Monbiot

Creative intention

People talk about creation as a remote fact of history, as if it were something that was attended to a long time ago, and finished at the time.

But creation was not an act; it is a process; and it is going on today as much as it ever was. And Nature is not in a hurry.

~ John Muir

Dana Seva – Selfless Service

I was on an email thread with a handful of smart sales leaders, and one person said the best sales reps are selfish and don’t spend their time helping their own teammates.

While I agree it’s important to prioritize one’s time, I’d argue the best reps are actually selfless and show care to customers and colleagues alike.

Our top sales performers are helpful, empathetic and have a heart of service. It’s inherent in the nature of the greatest salespeople, but you can’t be a human built on service and only show it while selling.

Simply put, in modern sales a heart of service is the best way to deliver value to your customers.

Case in point is someone I really admire – our Enterprise Sales Executive Kevin Walkup. Kevin is one of the kindest, most selfless and most caring salespeople in the world. His colleagues continually praise him for his empathy and how he much he gives. He’s also our top producer – two years strong! – and has generated us over $3mm ARR. Those who know him would say it’s bc he’s focused on serving ALL those with whom he interacts.

Selflessness is infectious, bringing joy and success to those around you both inside and outside of the workplace.

Can a sales professional be a success even if they are selfless?

~ Kyle Porter, CEO of Salesloft